Le Havre, World Heritage Site

Main Living Area, Perret Show-Flat.

Principles of interior lay-outs

The interior lay-outs of the first blocks follow the principles voiced by Perret, keen on “flexibility” of the arrangement. The wishes and “personality of the resident” must be respected as he will “decorate his home” and “this decoration will vary”. (Perret, 1924).

The interior lay-outs of the first blocks follow the principles voiced by Perret, keen on “flexibility” of the arrangement. The wishes and “personality of the resident” must be respected as he will “decorate his home” and “this decoration will vary”. (Perret, 1924).

Close to the French windows are the kitchen, bedrooms and lounge which must, according to Perret, make up “a large common room for the whole family, that therefore the woman needs not be shut away in a room at the back, that her home activities need not prevent her from taking part in the family life”.

The interior space is flexible thanks to folding and sliding partitions, folding screens which can close off or enlarge spaces, thus making housework easier.

The kitchen, dining area, sitting-room, lounge make up “a large common room where family life takes place… The father can write letters or read the newspaper, the children play or do their homework: as for the mother, she can stay with them, even when preparing meals. It is time to do away with the domestic slavery of women”.

Slideshow

CEPAC Kitchen Block.
Show-flat Plan, 1947.
Studies for flat lay-out plans, 1947.